Stress Affect

Building the Nation

News

Memorial Day ceremonies and other activities are planned in Raton, Springer and at Vietnam Veterans Memorial State Park near Angel Fire as veterans who sacrificed their lives at war, as well as those who served their country and returned home, are remembered this weekend. In Raton, the local Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 1793 has organized the annual ceremonies at each of the city’s two cemeteries. The Monday ceremony at Mount Calvary Cemetery (on Red River Road just west of South Fifth Street) will begin at 8 a.m. Monday, to be followed by a ceremony at Fairmont Cemetery (on Sugarite Avenue between Washington and East Boulevard streets), expected to begin about 8:45 a.m. The ceremonies are to include presentations from the VFW and its Ladies Auxiliary, American Legion, Disabled American Veterans, Elks Lodge, and United Mine Workers of America.

Following the ceremony at Fairmont Cemetery, the VFW will host a free community breakfast at the post home (106 Park Ave.)

Prior to the ceremonies Monday, volunteers will begin at 6:15 a.m. setting up flags around the Tourist Information Center at South Second Street and Clayton Road. They will then move on to set up more flags on the county building lawn (230 N. Third Street) and nearby in front of city hall (224 Savage Ave.). All volunteers are welcome to help set up the estimated 200 flags, as well as take them down that day at 4 p.m.

In Springer, flags will be placed at the cemetery beginning at 6 a.m. Monday, with a Memorial Day service planned there at 10 a.m. On Saturday, the holiday weekend gets underway with an open house at the Santa Fe Trail Museum (516 Maxwell Ave.) from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Meanwhile, Vietnam Veterans Memorial State Park near Angel Fire will hold its annual Memorial Day activities during the long weekend.

Vietnam veteran and author Jack McLean will present a talk and sign copies of his book, Loon, on Saturday from 4 to 5 p.m. and again Sunday from 2 to 3 p.m. A prisoner of war/missing in action presentation is scheduled for Saturday from 3 to 4 p.m. and Sunday from 1 to 2 p.m. The presentation will provide information from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command, which has a mission of trying to achieve the fullest possible accounting of all Americans missing as a result of the nations’ past conflicts.

The remaining schedule of events at the memorial:

Sunday: 11 a.m.-noon — Sandra Wasko-Flood, founder of Living Labyrinths for Peace, will discuss the history of the project and how it is used in healing programs for veterans. People will be able to walk a labyrinth nearby; 6-7:30 p.m. — candlelight vigil featuring speakers from veterans organizations.

Monday: 8:30-9 a.m. — Taos Pueblo shows how it pays tribute to its warriors as singers and drum songs will honor veterans; 9-9:30 a.m. — flag march in which volunteers carry a 40-by-60-foot U.S. flag from N.M. 434 and U.S. 64 to the memorial (volunteers can meet at the starting intersection at 8:45 a.m.); 9-11 a.m. — Ride to Pride, a Las Vegas, N.M.-based group, will be on site with a couple horses to talk about equine-assisted therapy programs for veterans and their families; 11 a.m. — Memorial Day ceremony.

Gold’s rebound from the biggest decline in more than three decades is sparking a revival in exploration – and for one Brazilian focused-miner it’s worth the risk of crossing paths with jaguars.

Beadell Resources Ltd. hired armed guards earlier this year to protect its exploration team in the Amazon rainforest in Brazil after they stumbled across the largest of South America’s big cats.

“Shareholders have gone from rewarding companies for doing no exploration, no expansions and cost reductions into rewarding companies for value-accretive exploration,” Beadell’s Managing Director Peter Bowler, said in an interview in Kalgoorlie, Western Australia, at the annual Diggers & Dealers conference. “About 70 percent of our shareholders would prefer us to drill, drill and drill.”

Producers from Gold Fields Ltd. to Northern Star Resources Ltd., who both attended the conference, are boosting exploration budgets that were trimmed as companies sought to cut costs amid gold’s 28 percent tumble last year. The mood mirrors comments last month by Rio Tinto Group Chief Executive Officer Sam Walsh who noted renewed investor appetite for spending.

“At some point you have to recommence spending, and in difficult times you’ve got to understand how to prioritize that spending,” said Roric Smith, vice president of discovery and chief geologist at Sydney-based Evolution Mining Ltd. “If you don’t replace your reserves, you’ve got a go-out-of-business strategy.”

Beadell rose 8.6 percent to 0.505 cents in Sydney trading, while Northern Star rose 5.5 percent.

Armed Guards
Exploration work will accelerate over the next 6 to 12 months, according to MinEx Consulting Pty, whose clients include Newmont Mining Corp., the second-biggest gold company, and AngloGold Ashanti Ltd., the third-biggest.

Beadell has allocated as much as $15 million for exploration in Brazil this year, up from $12 million in 2013, and may add funding, if teams in Brazil and in Australia make discoveries, Bowler said. The Perth-based company’s geologists encountered the jaguar when they were looking for deposits near their Tucano mine in Amapa state.

“That was enough to sharpen their senses,” said Bowler on Aug. 5. “We do see jaguar tracks in the morning around the mine site quite regularly.”

Spending on gold exploration in Australia, the second- biggest producer, fell in the three months to March 31 to A$81.7 million ($76.4 million), the lowest quarterly total since March 2000, according to the country’s Bureau of Statistics.

Constrained Budgets
The exploration budgets of some companies remain constrained. Barrick Gold Corp., the biggest producer, allocated $200 million to $240 million to exploration in 2014, compared to a 2013 budget of $230 million to $250 million, according to its annual report. Newmont also has trimmed spending on exploration, though Chief Executive Officer Gary Goldberg says it remains a critical task.

“You’ve got to be constantly adding to reserves and resources around existing mines, but also out and looking for other things,” Goldberg told reporters today in Melbourne. “It’s the least expensive way to acquire a new asset.”

AngloGold spent $34 million in the three months to March, compared to $92 million in the same period a year earlier, according to a May filing. “The level of exploration that we’ve got now isn’t something that we’d be satisfied with in the long term,” AngloGold Executive Vice President Planning and Technical Graham Ehm said by phone from Perth in a July 31 interview.

Customer Record
Gold investor demand showed signs of rebounding in July with holdings of BullionVault customers rising to a record after gold rallied 10 percent in the first half. Gold, which traded at $1,307.12 at 3:50 p.m. Sydney time, rose 10 percent in the first half and may rise to $1,400 by 2017, Citigroup Inc. said in a July 13 report.

Johannesburg-based Gold Fields has increased its Australian exploration budget to A$55 million from A$25 million last year and will probably raise it again next year, Executive Vice President for Australasia Richard Weston said in an interview. Northern Star, which has more than doubled this year, has allocated A$50 million in 2014, compared to a previous annual budget of about A$10 million.

“Companies have got their businesses back into shape and they are now starting to look to the future and get back out into the field,” said MinEx Managing Director Richard Schodde. “The good news is that the costs of drilling services are cheaper now then they were a year ago, so you can get more bang for your exploration buck.”

Search Costs
The cost of exploration activities including drilling and the testing of samples has reduced by as much as 30 percent in the past year, according to Peter Bradford, Chief Executive Officer of Independence Group NL, which collaborated with AngloGold on the 2005 discovery of the Tropicana project, in Western Australia, which began production in September and may hold as much as 7.7 million ounces of gold.

Independence Group, which has gained 53 percent this year in Sydney trading, may seek to invest in or acquire advanced exploration projects held by smaller companies with dwindling cash reserves, according to Bradford. “People just don’t have the money of their own and need to progress projects, or run the risk of losing tenure, so we are directing more dollars to that,” he said.

When ICANN, (Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers) the organization that oversees the web name space, announced plans to offer new generic top-level domains (gTLDs), which will allow a company to own what are being called .brand domains, it opened the door for tremendous opportunity for marketers and advertisers alike. For the moment however not many CMOs are all that excited.

CMOs Need To Look At New Domains As An Opportunity, Not A Trademark Protection Nuisance

The Big Opportunity CMOs May Miss Out On

Marketers debate usefulness of ICANN’s new domain names

Those were headlines from two recent articles I came across regarding the apparent apprehension on the part of CMOs and marketers in general. Accordng to Forrester Research principal analyst Jeff Ernst not many CMOs are buying into what Peter Dengate Thrush, chairman of the ICANN board said in regards to the new domain names. “Today’s decision will usher in a new Internet age. We have provided a platform for the next generation of creativity and inspiration.”

Enrst, in an article for Forbes on this topic, wrote “Many of the CMOs I’ve talked to over the past year either weren’t aware that this was coming or didn’t recognize what a company could do with a “.brand” TLD that they couldn’t already do with a .com.” And on his own Forrester blog he wrote “Many marketing leaders I’ve talked with look at this as a nuisance and are skeptical about whether Internet users will embrace [the new domain names].”

The Big Opportunity CMOs May Miss Out On

Now truth be told, there will be an application fee of $185,000 for any company wanting to register one of these new .brand domains but why wouldn’t a company like say Home Depot not want to pay the $185K for the rights to .homedepot? I agree completely with Ernst when he says “A .brand TLD gives marketers much greater control of their online identities. You can now promote your brand at the root of the Internet with shorter, less technical URLs. You can combine all your Web properties, including product sites, campaign microsites, and country-specific Web sites, under a single brand umbrella.”

Is it me or is this a no-brainer for brands/advertisers/marketers?

Yes, there is the $185,000 fee plus the cost to maintain the infrastructure but there is also the issue of fraud. As Jim Nichols recently pointed out in a column on Forbes.com, “The risk of an unscrupulous person trying to hijack your company’s identity will have a tougher time when official pages end with a .brand extension.”

So, what do you think of all this?

Is it much ado about nothing?

Should brands/advertisers/marketers not even worry about all this?

Or do you agree and think there is tremendous value in owning your own TLD?