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Pendred Syndrome: is Your Child at Risk?

There are many conditions that can affect the hearing of children. Some of these conditions are from physical damage and some are genetic. Care can be taken to avoid physical problems however precious little can be done to avoid genetic conditions although once in a while there may be something that can be done. You can learn all about that through sonus complete reviews by clicking here. 

One of the conditions that can affect a child’s hearing is Pendred syndrome named after Vaughn Pendred who first diagnosed the condition.

Pendred syndrome is a genetic disorder that causes early hearing loss in kids and it may be present at birth or it may not come on until the child is three-years-old.

Pendred syndrome is an illness that causes a large range of affectations which makes it difficult to diagnose.

Of course, Pendred syndrome affects hearing. It may come on all at once or it may occur a little at a time. Further, a person may become entirely deaf.

Another mystery of the illness is that a person may become deaf and then they may get their hearing back for no explainable reason. Loss of hearing usually occurs in both ears.

Pendred syndrome can also affect the thyroid gland as well as balance.

Pendred syndrome causes the thyroid to enlarge. This causes a problem with swallowing and breathing. An enlarged thyroid occurs in 60% of the patients.

Pendred syndrome may also affect the vestibular system that affects balance. While 60% of Pendred syndrome sufferers have an enlarged goiter, 40% will have an enlarged vestibular system.

While all of these problems affect many children, outside of the hearing problems, most kids physically develop alright and are able to physically function day-to-day.

A mutation of a gene known as SLC26A4 (also called the PDS gene), can cause Pendred syndrome. Another name it is called is chromosome 7.

If there is a family history a couple can consult a genetic counselor to see if they are at risk of having a child with Pendred syndrome.

The way that Pendred syndrome is diagnosed is by evaluating the history of the child and the nature of the hearing loss. Also, there is an evaluation of the thyroi d and vestibular system.

Finally, the physician may use an MR (magnetic resonance imaging) or, he may use a CT or CAT scan to evaluate the ear.

The physical results may be a malformed cochlear or as mentioned an enlarged vestibular system.

There is no cure for Pendred syndrome.

However, it is important to catch the condition early.

If the condition is caught a child can get and get used to a cochlear implant, another hearing device, and perhaps the most important thing is to learn sign language.

Our children face many challenges while growing up. Beginning at birth we must be vigilant to identify special risks.

Jaime
Jaime London is a writer, contributor, editor and a photographer. He started his career as an editorial assistant in a publishing company in Chicago in 2009.