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How to Keep Your Child Healthy for Years to Come

Your child is growing every day. Nutrition is the foundation of growth. First of all, your child needs fluids. Lots of fluids…Children move a lot, they sweat and lose fluids more quickly than adults. They are at risk of dehydration. Symptoms of dehydration are dizziness, nausea, and weakness. If your child develops any of these symptoms, and does not respond to water, run, don’t walk to the nearest hospital. Dehydration is dangerous, and can damage vital organs, if left untreated.

It is essential that children drink lots of water. Water also flushes out toxins. In this modern era of pollution and chemical poisons, it is important to move toxins out of a child’s system whenever possible.

Your child needs five to nine servings of fruits and vegetables daily. If your child, like many children, has not developed the taste for vegetables yet, give your child fruit instead. Much of the nutrition in vegetables is also in fruits. Vegetables taste bitter to children, and as taste buds change with maturity, most children will eat vegetables when they are ready. Never force children to eat vegetables. That can backfire by making children avoid vegetables for life. In order to buy megasporebiotic, all the essential information should be available with the person. The products should be not made available to the children for the consumption. The avoidance of the products should be done when there will be harmful effects on the health of the person. The serving of the food should be done in the best possible way for the person. 

Try offering your child a delicious, cold fruit smoothie. Throw in fresh bananas, strawberries, fruit juice and yogurt. Your child will receive four or five of the much needed helpings of fresh fruits. If your child seems disinterested in the smoothie, try offering the smoothie after your child has gone outside to play. It will be downed with eagerness after your child’s physical workout.

Yogurt with live cultures is important for children. Yogurt prevents stomach flu and gastrointestinal troubles brought on by unwashed hands, and handling of pets. Since children generally live closer to the earth, yogurt is a preventative measure against the intake of germs, and other prowlers of the digestive tract.

Soy milk is growing in popularity. With its high amount of protein and calcium, it is a surefire “must” for children with allergies to dairy. Soy milk has less sodium and less fat than dairy milk, yet has many of the same nutrients. Soy milk is good for the heart.

Heart health is important, even if your children are young. Autopsies done on American soldiers in Vietnam, who were as young as eighteen and nineteen years of age, produced shocking evidence of arteries clogged with plaque. Much of plaque is cause by saturated fats and trans fats.

Saturated fats are found in meats, especially red meat, such as bacon, pork and beef. Saturated fats are found in dairy foods, too. Limiting these foods is a good idea. Buying lean cuts and low fat , or non-fat, dairy foods is a good preventative measure to safeguard your children’s health.

Trans fats are not only harmful to the heart, they also create weight problems.. Legislation has been passed lately to outlaw trans frats in restaurants. How do you know if you have trans fats in the food you are feeding your children? Look at the ingredients. If the ingredients say: “partially hydrogenated,” you are serving your children trans fats. It doesn’t matter what is partially hydrogenated, it could be soybean, palm, coconut oil, etc. “Partially hydrogenated” means the oils harden when they warm up. With a body’s temperature hitting 92 or 93 degrees, this substance will thicken, harden, and eventually block free flowing, healthy passage ways in the body.

Unfortunately, many of the cheaper, quick, frozen foods have trans fats in them. Safer oil alternatives are olive oil, safflower oil and canola oil. However, purer, healthier, oils are more expensive. It is up to you to weigh the price tag. If your child has a constant diet of “partially hydrogenated” foods, you are increasing your child’s chances of suffering later. Do you really want to do that?

Another problem with frozen, canned, and packaged foods, is the high amount of sodium. Look again at the ingredients, and see the amount of sodium in the food. Many packages will give the percentage of sodium. Often it is as much as fifty percent. If your child’s intake of sodium is not matched by an equal amount of potassium, your child’s health will be impacted. Lack of potassium can hurt your child’s electric system, a system your child’s heart depends on to function smoothly. Too much sodium in childhood can pave the way for high blood pressure later. Foods high in potassium that counter the high intake of sodium are bananas, potatoes, and orange juice.

Finally, the fresher your child’s foods, and the less pesticides, the safer for your child. Pesticides have dioxin in them, a toxin which stores in your child’s fat cells and creates damage on a cellular level. In the final outcome, how you feed your child is akin to putting money in a bank account for your child’s future. The more healthy foods in childhood, the greater your gift of health to your child, in later years when you’re no longer cooking.

Jaime
Jaime London is a writer, contributor, editor and a photographer. He started his career as an editorial assistant in a publishing company in Chicago in 2009.